Auspicious site(明堂)

Auspicious site

Headword

명당 ( 明堂 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Sangnye|Jangnye

Writer JangJangsik(張長植)

The word myeongdang refers to an auspicious site determined according to the principles of pungsu, or geomancy.

Myeongdang refers to an auspicious site that according to pungsu (Chin. feng shui) is considered the best site upon which to build a grave or house, as it would have a beneficial influence upon the descendants of its occupant. The term is also used to refer to the forehead in traditional Korean physiognomy, or the throne hall at the royal palace. In pungsu theory, the term came to develop a more complex symbolism. For instance, it refers to an area of land located in front of a point called hyeol, which is surrounded by sasin (Kor. 사신, Chin. 四神, the four guardian deities of the four cardinal directions): Blue Dragon, White Tiger, Red Phoenix, and Black Tortoise-Snake.

The word pungsu is a compoud of the words for wind (pung) and water (su). It originated from the four-character saying jangpungdeuksu (Kor. 장풍득수, Chin. 藏風得水, lit. storing wind and obtaining water), which signifies that one needs to be protected against wind and obtain water, because the life force of the land can be easily scattered when soit faces wind, but stays solid when surrounded by water. According to this basic concept, myeongdang is a specific site, the “best land of all land, ” because it can block wind and retain water. Hyeol is a crucial point of land in pungsu theory. When used for a grave site it is where the dead can receive the life force of the land, and when used for a house it is where the people who live in it spend most of their time. Myeongdang is typically a piece of land, wide and level, located in front of a hyeol. Therefore, myeongdang is the key factor in pungsu theory.

Auspicious site

Auspicious site
Headword

명당 ( 明堂 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Sangnye|Jangnye

Writer JangJangsik(張長植)

The word myeongdang refers to an auspicious site determined according to the principles of pungsu, or geomancy.

Myeongdang refers to an auspicious site that according to pungsu (Chin. feng shui) is considered the best site upon which to build a grave or house, as it would have a beneficial influence upon the descendants of its occupant. The term is also used to refer to the forehead in traditional Korean physiognomy, or the throne hall at the royal palace. In pungsu theory, the term came to develop a more complex symbolism. For instance, it refers to an area of land located in front of a point called hyeol, which is surrounded by sasin (Kor. 사신, Chin. 四神, the four guardian deities of the four cardinal directions): Blue Dragon, White Tiger, Red Phoenix, and Black Tortoise-Snake.

The word pungsu is a compoud of the words for wind (pung) and water (su). It originated from the four-character saying jangpungdeuksu (Kor. 장풍득수, Chin. 藏風得水, lit. storing wind and obtaining water), which signifies that one needs to be protected against wind and obtain water, because the life force of the land can be easily scattered when soit faces wind, but stays solid when surrounded by water. According to this basic concept, myeongdang is a specific site, the “best land of all land, ” because it can block wind and retain water. Hyeol is a crucial point of land in pungsu theory. When used for a grave site it is where the dead can receive the life force of the land, and when used for a house it is where the people who live in it spend most of their time. Myeongdang is typically a piece of land, wide and level, located in front of a hyeol. Therefore, myeongdang is the key factor in pungsu theory.