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ParkHyeyoung

13 count

ParkHyeyoung

13

Dodukjaebigut

A performance based on the story of catching a thief featured in Honam Nongak in which the sangsoe (lead small gong player), musicians (apchibae), and flag bearers, and the daeposu (lead actor) and other actors (japsaek) divide into two sides, the ally and the enemy. Dodukjaebigut (thief-catching performance) is also called posumokbegi (beheading the hunter) as it features a scene in which the hunter’s hat is taken off for discipline and punishment. Dodukjaebigut in Gurye Jansu Nongak is a perfo

Korean Folk Arts

Japsaeknori

Performances by actors called japsaek who dress as a certain character and take part in the nongak (farmers’ music) troupe, but not as musicians. In a nongak performance, japsaek can be described as the actors. Japsaeknori endows nongak with a theatrical element and gives the audience a new understanding of the reality of the world surrounding them. Japsaek create complex formations of pungmul by playing “a role of gathering and spreading, and mixing and mingling” as their name imply. Such forma

Korean Folk Arts

Geollipgut

Rite performed by a pungmul troupe to collect money and rice while playing percussion instruments, including the gong, small gong, hourglass-shaped drum, and barrel drum, to ward off evil spirits and pray for good fortune. Geollip (Kor. 걸립, Chin. 乞粒, lit. begging for grains) is also called geolgong (Kor. 걸공, Chin. 乞功), geolgung (Kor. 걸궁, Chin. 乞躬), geollyang (Kor. 걸량, Chin. 乞糧), geolhaeng (Kor. 걸행, Chin. 乞行), haenggeol (Kor. 행걸, Chin. 行乞), which all refer to the act of begging or collecting mone

Korean Folk Arts

Japsaektal

Mask worn by the actors called japseak. Japsaektal (actor’s mask) is made by the locals mainly with materials like wood, paper, or gourds. The mask is referred to as gwangdae. Whether masks are actually worn by nongak troupes has been much debated, because wearing a mask during the performance is considered as a low remnant of masked drama due to its possible connection with talnori (mask performance). In the Honam region there are many japsaek and many of them wear masks. Among them, the masks

Korean Folk Arts

Daeposu

The head of the party of actors (japsaek) in a nongak (farmers’ music) troupe in the Honam region, the daeposu enjoys the same status as the sangsoe (lead small gong player). The daeposu (Kor. 대포수, Chin. 大砲手, lit. great gun carrier) is the lead actor and the person who controls the percussionists at the commands of the sangsoe, both leading the musicians and managing the crowd with the dignity of a general. As the head of the japsaek, he sometimes wears a mask, depending on region, and points a

Korean Folk Arts

Jorijung

An actor (japsaek) in the role of a monk who wanders about swinging the ornaments attached to his straw hat (songnak) or traditional conical hat made of bamboo (satgat) that is worn by nongak performers, or sounding a wooden gong. The jorijung goes around begging as he strikes a wooden gong and chants. He also offers prayers or collects bad luck with a strainer. Wearing a mask and making noises by shaking the bells hanging on his nose or the gourd attached at his waist, he makes comic gestures t

Korean Folk Arts

Mudong

A young child who is a member of a troupe of female itinerant entertainers (sadangpae) or male itinerant entertainers (namsadangpae) or a nongak (farmers’ music) troupe and takes part in big entertainment-oriented nongak performances (pangut) as a dancer, or rides on the shoulders of an adult male and entertains the crowd with various skills and feats. The mudong (Kor. 무동, Chin. 舞童, lit. dancing child) are also known as pijori. The children are dressed in a red skirt, yellow top, a long, navy bl

Korean Folk Arts

Nonggu

Nonggu is an actor (japsaek) who mimics the gestures and skills of the musicians playing the gongs (soejaebi) while twirling a hat with long streamer (sangmo) and dancing with the nongak musicians (chibae) following signals given by the lead small gong player (sangsoe). In general, nonggu follows the sangsoe around and dances or imitates the acrobatics and other skills of the soejaebi. He assists the small gong player while sounding the gong after busoe (second small gong player) or jongsoe (thi

Korean Folk Arts

Uksu Nongak

Nongak (farmers’ music) handed down in Uksu-dong, Daegu, which originated in a rite to the Lord of Heaven (Cheonwangsin) who descends on the site via the spirit pole in a ceremony called daenaerim. Uksu Nongak, designated Intangible Cultural Heritage No. 3 of the city of Daegu in May 1988, originated in a rite to the Lord of Heaven called cheongwangbadi, literally meaning “receiving Cheongwang.” In this rite, the Lord of Heaven descends on a spirit pole and is “received” and served. The purpose

Korean Folk Arts

Geumneung Binnae Nongak

Nongak (farmers’ music) handed down in Gwangcheon-dong, Gaeryeongmyeon, Gimcheon in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. Binnae Nongak was designated Intangible Cultural Heritage No. 8 of Gyeongsangbuk-do Province in December 1984. Binnae is the original name of Gwangcheon-dong. Nongak was performed in the village on the sixth day of the first lunar month when the rite to the village tutelary deity (dongje) was held. Located on low lying land the village frequently suffered from flooding and the bitsingut

Korean Folk Arts

Mudongnori

Young children (mostly boys) dressed up as girls or child monks performing acrobatics and various other skills or stunts hoisted on the shoulders of adult performers. Mudongnori was performed by itinerant groups of male entertainers called namdasangpae mostly around Gyeonggi-do Province as an expression of people’s prayers and wishes for longevity and to prevent an epidemic. Hyeomnyulsa, Korea’s first modern indoor theater, had some 80 affiliated members consisting of namsadang members and gisae

Korean Folk Arts

Japsaek

A member of the nongak (farmers’ music) troupe dressed as a certain character who acts out various skits. Japsaek (Kor. 잡색, Chin. 雜色, lit. mixed colors) are referred to as the dwitchibae, the actors who lead a nongak performance along with apchibae, who play musical instruments, the bearers of different flags including the farming community flag (nonggi) and command flag (yeonggi), and the player of the double-reed oboe (saenapsu). The japsaek lead the second half of the performance (dwitgut) ra

Korean Folk Arts

Ilgwangnori

Performance featured in the nongak (farmers’ music) of the Honam region in which the sangsoe (lead small gong player) and soejaebi (other small gong players) dance and make line formations (jinpuri) then lose one of the gongs and exchange jokes with the daeposu (lead actor playing the role of hunter) as they to find it. Ilgwangnori is performed before dodukjaebigut (lit. thief catching rite) in nongak performed in parts of the Honam region (Jeolla-do Province), including Gimje, Jeongeup, Buan, G

Korean Folk Arts
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