Authors

all : 1

LeeHaejun

6 count

LeeHaejun

6

Book of a Thousand Characters by a Thousand People

A book of a thousand Chinese characters, each written by a different person as a prayer for the health, longevity, and well-being of a newborn baby. “Cheonin-cheonjamun” is a book produced as a result of the efforts of the grandfather or the father of a newborn baby who ask a thousand acquaintances in person to ask each of them to write a single letter from “Cheonjamun.” The book embodies the grandfather’s and father’s wishes for the wisdom of the one thousand people who wrote the characters to

Korean Rites of Passage

Code of clan regulations

Code of clan regulations as the basis of a kin system that organizes a clan, succeeds memorial ceremonies, and integrates tribes. Jongbeop is a code of clan regulations as the basis of the paternal kin system in Korea; it especially distinguishes gije (Kor. 기제, Chin. 忌祭, death anniversary rite held at home) from sije (Kor. 시제, Chin. 時祭, memorial rite held outside the home). Above all, jongbeop defines the range of a clan formed by descendants who share the same great-great-grandfather (dangnaech

Korean Rites of Passage

Village Cooperative Records

Donggyemunseo are records kept by the village cooperative donggye regarding the preparation and management of communal rituals. Donggye is a cooperative formed to prepare for the annual village tutelary festivals (dongje), and alternate terms include daedonggye (grand village cooperative) and sanhyanggye (mountain village cooperative). The cooperative must maintain all records related to the rituals: details about the sacrifices offered including costs; list of ritual officials; and list of dono

Korean Folk Beliefs

Shrine for Rain Rite

Giujedang is a shrine for holding rain rites (giuje) in times of drought. Rain rites are held inside rock caves or by ponds or springs deep in the mountains. Some wellknown giujedang where these rites have long been held include the shrine at Mt. Jinak’s Mulgul Peak in Geumsan, South Chungcheong Province; the shrine at Cheongjing Pond in the village of Samgari in Jinsan, South Chungcheong; and Dragon Pond at Handugol Valley in the village of Sangbancheolli in Samcheok, Gangwon Province. The Mulg

Korean Folk Beliefs

Shrine for Rain Rite

Giujedang is a shrine for holding rain rites (giuje) in times of drought. Rain rites are held inside rock caves or by ponds or springs deep in the mountains. Some wellknown giujedang where these rites have long been held include the shrine at Mt. Jinak’s Mulgul Peak in Geumsan, South Chungcheong Province; the shrine at Cheongjing Pond in the village of Samgari in Jinsan, South Chungcheong; and Dragon Pond at Handugol Valley in the village of Sangbancheolli in Samcheok, Gangwon Province. The Mulg

Korean Folk Beliefs

On Shamanism in Joseon

“Joseonmusokgo (On Shamanism in Joseon)” was an article published by scholar Yi Neung-hwa in 1927 in the No. 19 issue of the journal Gyemyeong (Enlightenment), published by Gyemyeong Gurakbu (Enlightenment Club), compiling a wide range of materials on Korean shamanism. Yi was a Chinese classics scholar and a foreign language educator who was appointed in 1921 as an editor for the Japanese Government-General and as a member of the Committee for the Compilation of Korean History in 1922, during wh

Korean Folk Beliefs
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