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KimChangho

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KimChangho

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Shamanic Rattle

Bangul is a rattle made of brass or copper, used as a shamanic tool in rituals. Shamanic rattles, also called muryeong, date back to the Bronze Age on the Korean peninsula, as shown by ancient relics including paljuryeong (eight-arm rattle), yuangnyeong (rattle attached to pole), and ssangduryeong (double-headed rattle), hwansangssangduryeong (ring-type double-headed rattle), all assumed to have served as tools for religious rituals. There are two types of bangul: one with a ball inside the ratt

Korean Folk Beliefs

Motor Vehicle Ritual

Jadongchagosa, or motor vehicle ritual, is a term that refers to rites held for the prevention of calamities that can occur while driving or riding cars and other vehicles. In Korean folk religion, the many calamities or bad luck that one can experience in life are called aek, jaeaek, or aegun, and rituals aimed at preventing these calamities were called aengmagi. Motor vehicle rituals are an updated version of the traditional calamity prevention ritual and are held upon the purchase of a new ca

Korean Folk Beliefs

Collector God

Geollipsin, or Collector God, is a deity that helps spirits or good fortune enter the house and be greeted. Geollip refers to the collection of grains or goods for a collective effort that serves a specific cause related to the public good and solidarity. It seems that this spirit of fundraising and participation has been developed into a conceptual deity. Geollipsin is a shamanic god, often enshrined in the image of Daegam (State Official God), which oversees material fortune, and is also calle

Korean Folk Beliefs

Shamanic Rattle

Bangul is a rattle made of brass or copper, used as a shamanic tool in rituals. Shamanic rattles, also called muryeong, date back to the Bronze Age on the Korean peninsula, as shown by ancient relics including paljuryeong (eight-arm rattle), yuangnyeong (rattle attached to pole), and ssangduryeong (double-headed rattle), hwansangssangduryeong (ring-type double-headed rattle), all assumed to have served as tools for religious rituals. There are two types of bangul: one with a ball inside the ratt

Korean Folk Beliefs

Wood Charcoal

Sut, or wood charcoal, in Korean folk religion, is believed to possess the power to keep out evil forces. When a new baby was born in the family, charcoal was tied to left-hand lay straw rope to hang as taboo rope (geumjul) for keeping out unclean persons and bad fortune, and the same rope was also placed inside sauce jars during fermentation process. Charcoal was sometimes offered as a sacrifice in household rituals for the kitchen deity Jowang. Wood charcoal is an effective dehumidifier, and w

Korean Folk Beliefs

Coin charm

Coins issued to commemorate some particular event or issue rather than for wide circulation as currency. This type of commemorative coin was first made on a trial basis to measure the purity level of the material with which coins were made. As the special coins gained popularity, decorative motifs began to appear on the coins according to the demands of the royal court and ruling class. The motifs used to decorate the coins were animals, plants, Chinese characters, and human figures associated w

Korean Rites of Passage

Miniature axe-head charm

An ornamental object in the shape of an axe-head worn by married women as a charm to obtain male offspring through divine intervention. Gijadokki is a miniature ornamental object in the shape of an axe head, secretly worn by married women who believed that it would help them to have a male child. Some women chose to wear samtaedokki, a charm of three axe heads linked with a string, expressing wishes for the boy they expected to be born with the luck of the three chief ministers. According to a r

Korean Rites of Passage

Flag Worship Rite

Gigosa is an annual rite held to worship nonggi, or farming flag, which serves as the icon of a village. Farming flags are closely related to Nongsin, or the Farming God, as well as Shennong-shi, or Divine Farmer, a legendary ruler of China. Most farming flags contain letters or passages, many of which are related to the Farming God or emphasize the importance of farming or agricultural philosophy. This demonstrates that the farming flag is a symbol of the Farming God and also an object of commu

Korean Folk Beliefs
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