Authors

all : 1

ImMinhyuk

8 count

ImMinhyuk

8

Ritual wailing

Ritual lamentation expressing grief over the dead person at a funeral. A traditional Confucian funeral ceremony performed in Korea consists of a series of formal stages where the mourners express their grief. The expressions of grief are intended to be in harmony with the procedure of the funeral performed. One of the most conspicuous ways of expressing grief is gok, a kind of ritual wailing performed by mourners to express their grief over the death of a loved one. The first gok is performed so

Korean Rites of Passage

Lit. peaceful rite

The last of all the memorial rites held for a recently deceased ancestor. The ceremony is held in one of the “middle months” (i.e. 2nd, 5th, 8th and 11th months by the lunar calendar) after daesang, a ceremony held to mark the second death anniversary. As suggested by the character dam (禫, meaing “quiet” or “peaceful”) in the name damje (禫祭), the ceremony needs to be held in a calm atmosphere. The ceremony is held in one of the “middle months” after daesang, or a rite held to mark the second dea

Korean Rites of Passage

Memorial rite on the second death anniversary

The ancestral memorial rite held on the second death anniversary of an ancestor Literally meaning “extremely auspicious day, ” daesang refers to an ancestral memorial rite performed on the second death anniversary of an ancestor. Without counting leap months, it is held twenty-five months after the funeral. On the day, the participants are required to wear special ceremonial garments called dambok, which are made of fine fabric woven with black threads as the warp and white as the weft. A very i

Korean Rites of Passage

Departure of the funeral procession from the home to the burial site

The funeral procedure of carrying the deceased from the home to the burial site. Barin refers to the funeral procession in which the coffin containing the body of the deceased is carried from the home to the grave. A great variety of symbolic objects were used in the funeral procession to express the wishes of the bereaved for the peaceful rest of the deceased. They were also believed to repel evil spirits. The procession is headed by Bangsangsi (Kor. 방상시, Chin. 方相氏, deity believed to protect th

Korean Rites of Passage

Notification of a person’s death

The practice of notifying relatives, friends, and neighbors of the death of a person. The term bugo refers to the act of promptly informing people of the death of a person by sending messengers to spread the news. Upon the death of a person, the family appointed hosang (Kor. 호상, Chin. 護喪, a man who presides over the entire funeral service) and had him write a formal notification of death. If no such person was available, the chief mourner informed the relatives of the death, but not friends or c

Korean Rites of Passage

Tomb-completion rite

Memorial rite performed after completing the tomb to console and bid farewell to the deceased. Completing the tomb, in the narrow sense, means building the mound over the burial site, but in a wider sense also includes the installation of decorative structures such as a tomb stele, stone table, stone figures and stone pillars. When all the work is completed, the bereaved family members console each other and bid farewell to the deceased before leaving the gravesite. “Gukjo-oryeui” (國朝五禮儀, Five R

Korean Rites of Passage

Ending the three-year mourning period

Taking off mourning clothes and returning to daily life after completing the three-year mourning period. The last procedure of sangnye (Kor. 상례, Chin. 喪禮, lit. funeral rites) is damje (Kor. 담제, Chin. 禫祭, rite to announce that the chief mourner returns to daily life after completing the funeral rites), which is performed twenty-seven days after the funeral. Dam (Kor. 담, Chin. 禫) means “calm and peaceful.” The mourner can take off his mourning clothes after completing the three-year mourning perio

Korean Rites of Passage

Removal of food offerings

Clearing all the food offerings and ritual utensils from the jesang (Kor. 제상, Chin. 祭床, ritual table). Cheolsang is removal of the food offerings and ritual utensils from a ritual table at the end of an ancestral rite. The task of dealing with the liquor set on the table is undertaken by the ritual master’s wife. Upon coming out of the shrine, the wife collects liquor remaining in cups, liquor jugs, and other bowls, and pours it into a bottle and seals it. The liquor sealed in the bottle is call

Korean Rites of Passage
<< 이전 1

1/1

>>