Sangmo(象帽)

Headword

상모 ( 象帽 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts

Writer KimEunjung(金垠呈)

A kind of a hat with feathers or paper streamers attached to the top which is worn when dancing and moving the head around (Kor. 머리춤, Chin. 首舞, lit. head dance) during a nongak performance.

Sangmo specifically refers to a thin red feather in the form of a spike or tassel that is attached to military hats called jeollip, helmets, flags, or spears and is also transcribed as sakmo (Kor. 삭모, Chin. 槊毛, lit. spear hat). Hats worn by nongak performers are generally classified as gokkal (peaked hat) and jeollip, a military hat with round top and wide brim (Kor. 전립, Chin. 氈笠, lit. felt hat). In the nongak context, jeollip is also called beonggeoji. The sangmo made of feathers or paper streamers is fixed on the jeollip, which is why the hat itself is commonly called sangmo.

There are several types of sangmo hats: buposangmo have feathers or paper attached, jongisangmo have paper ornaments, budeulsangmo have soft feathers, and chaesangmo have a long paper streamer. If the streamer is very long the hat is called ginsangmo (lit. long sangmo). Buposangmo, which is mostly worn by the lead gong player (sangsoe), has a tuft of ostrich feathers attached, while jongisangmo has a tuft of thin strips of paper attached to a cord, which makes it very light and consequently enables the wearer to make rapid movements. Budeulsangmo has a soft blossom-shaped tuft attached with string at the top of the hat, and chaesangmo has an arm’s-length ribbon attached to a cord. The ginsangmo gains its name from its long 12-foot ribbon.

In terms of the shapes of sangmo worn in nongak performances, the lead gong player wears a hat with horsehair or feathers attached to the end of a bead, which represents the wearer’s status or rank. The other percussionists (chibae) wear paper or similar ornaments on their hats. The hats draw the attention of the spectators to the dance movements, which highlights the twirling of the hat, or rather, the movements of the head and the ornaments on top.

In nongak, hats called sangmo feature feathers or paper attachments that stream lightly through the air, like the long sleeve extensions of Korean clothing (hansam), to enrich the dance movements. This is related to the nature of nongak in which the musicians play their instruments as they dance. As their hands are busy striking their instruments, they move their heads to twirl the feathers or ribbons on their hats in place of dance movements.

Sangmo

Sangmo
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts

Writer KimEunjung(金垠呈)

A kind of a hat with feathers or paper streamers attached to the top which is worn when dancing and moving the head around (Kor. 머리춤, Chin. 首舞, lit. head dance) during a nongak performance. Sangmo specifically refers to a thin red feather in the form of a spike or tassel that is attached to military hats called jeollip, helmets, flags, or spears and is also transcribed as sakmo (Kor. 삭모, Chin. 槊毛, lit. spear hat). Hats worn by nongak performers are generally classified as gokkal (peaked hat) and jeollip, a military hat with round top and wide brim (Kor. 전립, Chin. 氈笠, lit. felt hat). In the nongak context, jeollip is also called beonggeoji. The sangmo made of feathers or paper streamers is fixed on the jeollip, which is why the hat itself is commonly called sangmo. There are several types of sangmo hats: buposangmo have feathers or paper attached, jongisangmo have paper ornaments, budeulsangmo have soft feathers, and chaesangmo have a long paper streamer. If the streamer is very long the hat is called ginsangmo (lit. long sangmo). Buposangmo, which is mostly worn by the lead gong player (sangsoe), has a tuft of ostrich feathers attached, while jongisangmo has a tuft of thin strips of paper attached to a cord, which makes it very light and consequently enables the wearer to make rapid movements. Budeulsangmo has a soft blossom-shaped tuft attached with string at the top of the hat, and chaesangmo has an arm’s-length ribbon attached to a cord. The ginsangmo gains its name from its long 12-foot ribbon. In terms of the shapes of sangmo worn in nongak performances, the lead gong player wears a hat with horsehair or feathers attached to the end of a bead, which represents the wearer’s status or rank. The other percussionists (chibae) wear paper or similar ornaments on their hats. The hats draw the attention of the spectators to the dance movements, which highlights the twirling of the hat, or rather, the movements of the head and the ornaments on top. In nongak, hats called sangmo feature feathers or paper attachments that stream lightly through the air, like the long sleeve extensions of Korean clothing (hansam), to enrich the dance movements. This is related to the nature of nongak in which the musicians play their instruments as they dance. As their hands are busy striking their instruments, they move their heads to twirl the feathers or ribbons on their hats in place of dance movements.