Bungnori(鼓戏)

Headword

북놀이 ( 鼓戏 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts

Writer LeeKyungyup(李京燁)

A form of nori (performance, lit. play) in which the buk (barrel drum) players hang their drums on their bodies and dance or make other body movements.

Though bungnori, in its simplest form, is the drum accompaniment for songs sung out in the fields during farming, it has developed as an individual performance featured in pangut, the entertainment-based component of nongak. When performing bungnori, the drummer hits not only the leather drum head but the edges as well, which enables wide diversification of tones and rhythms. In terms of method of performance, bungnori can be divided into that played with one drumstick and that played with two drumsticks. Generally, using one drumstick is more common but in some parts of Jindo in Jeolla-do Province and Geumneung and Gimhae in Gyeongsang-do Province, two drumsticks are used. In the case of dancing and drumming using one drumstick, the drum is held at the front or raised in front of the face using the string around the handle. In the case of dancing and drumming using two drumsticks, the buk is tied to hang at the front and played by hitting both heads as if it were a janggu (hourglass-shaped drum).

The standard for dance using one drumstick is Miryang Bungnori (Miryang Drum Dance) Some of the major moves are as follows. “Three forward, three backward” is a move where the two sides of the drum are hit in turn while taking three steps forward and then three steps backward. When doing “turning on the spot, ” the basic drum rhythm is played and then turning with one foot lifted off the ground. Yeonpungdae is jumping in the air and turning while hugging the drum close to the body. “Magpie walking” is taking two steps to one rhythm cycle while hitting the edge of the drum or the drum head, the right leg slightly bent at the knee, walking diagonally or in a straight line. “Striking the drum with feet apart” is hitting the drum hard with one leg forward, bent slightly at the knee, and the other leg to the back. “Striking the drum with one foot off the ground” is bringing one leg up so that the drum rests on the knee and hopping and turning on the spot. The deotbaegi dance is placing the drum at the left hip, raising the right hand up with the drumstick hanging downward, taking all tension out of the body and dancing loosely and slowly to the gutgeori rhythm.

Jindo Bungnori (Jindo Drum Dance) shows many dance movements using both drumsticks. The “shoulder dance” (eokkaechum) is striking the drum with both hands then raising the arms up or to the sides and moving the shoulders up and down on the spot. “Walking fast and turning” means striking the drum rapidly to various rhythms and quickly turning on the spot. “Jumping on the spot” is jumping up once on the spot at the first beat while playing the gutgeori rhythm. Yeongpungdae is walking at a fast pace and turning in the air. Turugeori (jabanttwigi) is holding the drum close to the body so that it doesn’t move and flipping sideways in the air. “Holding the legs to the side” is raising the legs to the side in turn while striking the drum. “Striking the drum and holding both hands up” means putting both hands on the head after striking the drum. “Running zigzag” is running in zigzag fashion while playing the basic drum rhythm. “Doing dadeumijil” is dancing while raising both hands above the head and bringing them down as if beating cloth on a stone to smooth it (dadeumijil).

Bungnori refers to a variety of dances and dance moves performed to the drum rhythms, which are characteristically energetic and powerful. The barrel drum called buk may look like a rough and simple instrument, but bungnori has been passed down in diverse ways according to performance style and rhythms used, reflecting regional color. While bungnori is included in the pangut part of a nongak performance it has developed into an independent performing art, as seen in Jindo Bungnori, which has been designated Intangible Cultural Heritage No. 18 of Jeollanamdo Province.

Bungnori

Bungnori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts

Writer LeeKyungyup(李京燁)

A form of nori (performance, lit. play) in which the buk (barrel drum) players hang their drums on their bodies and dance or make other body movements. Though bungnori, in its simplest form, is the drum accompaniment for songs sung out in the fields during farming, it has developed as an individual performance featured in pangut, the entertainment-based component of nongak. When performing bungnori, the drummer hits not only the leather drum head but the edges as well, which enables wide diversification of tones and rhythms. In terms of method of performance, bungnori can be divided into that played with one drumstick and that played with two drumsticks. Generally, using one drumstick is more common but in some parts of Jindo in Jeolla-do Province and Geumneung and Gimhae in Gyeongsang-do Province, two drumsticks are used. In the case of dancing and drumming using one drumstick, the drum is held at the front or raised in front of the face using the string around the handle. In the case of dancing and drumming using two drumsticks, the buk is tied to hang at the front and played by hitting both heads as if it were a janggu (hourglass-shaped drum). The standard for dance using one drumstick is Miryang Bungnori (Miryang Drum Dance) Some of the major moves are as follows. “Three forward, three backward” is a move where the two sides of the drum are hit in turn while taking three steps forward and then three steps backward. When doing “turning on the spot, ” the basic drum rhythm is played and then turning with one foot lifted off the ground. Yeonpungdae is jumping in the air and turning while hugging the drum close to the body. “Magpie walking” is taking two steps to one rhythm cycle while hitting the edge of the drum or the drum head, the right leg slightly bent at the knee, walking diagonally or in a straight line. “Striking the drum with feet apart” is hitting the drum hard with one leg forward, bent slightly at the knee, and the other leg to the back. “Striking the drum with one foot off the ground” is bringing one leg up so that the drum rests on the knee and hopping and turning on the spot. The deotbaegi dance is placing the drum at the left hip, raising the right hand up with the drumstick hanging downward, taking all tension out of the body and dancing loosely and slowly to the gutgeori rhythm. Jindo Bungnori (Jindo Drum Dance) shows many dance movements using both drumsticks. The “shoulder dance” (eokkaechum) is striking the drum with both hands then raising the arms up or to the sides and moving the shoulders up and down on the spot. “Walking fast and turning” means striking the drum rapidly to various rhythms and quickly turning on the spot. “Jumping on the spot” is jumping up once on the spot at the first beat while playing the gutgeori rhythm. Yeongpungdae is walking at a fast pace and turning in the air. Turugeori (jabanttwigi) is holding the drum close to the body so that it doesn’t move and flipping sideways in the air. “Holding the legs to the side” is raising the legs to the side in turn while striking the drum. “Striking the drum and holding both hands up” means putting both hands on the head after striking the drum. “Running zigzag” is running in zigzag fashion while playing the basic drum rhythm. “Doing dadeumijil” is dancing while raising both hands above the head and bringing them down as if beating cloth on a stone to smooth it (dadeumijil). Bungnori refers to a variety of dances and dance moves performed to the drum rhythms, which are characteristically energetic and powerful. The barrel drum called buk may look like a rough and simple instrument, but bungnori has been passed down in diverse ways according to performance style and rhythms used, reflecting regional color. While bungnori is included in the pangut part of a nongak performance it has developed into an independent performing art, as seen in Jindo Bungnori, which has been designated Intangible Cultural Heritage No. 18 of Jeollanamdo Province.