Mole Wedding

Headword

두더지의 혼사 ( Mole Wedding )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer SimWoojang(沈愚章)

This tale narrates the story of a mole searching for the world’s best groom for its daughter, who in the end gets a mole as its son-in-law.

The narrative is documented in Sunoji (Fifteen- Day Record) by Hong Man-jong. In the oral tradition, the tale has been transmitted since ancient times across Asia, with various versions that feature other animals like rats, and the mountains as the higher being.

A long time ago there lived a mole who had a beautiful daughter. He wanted the best groom in the world for his daughter, and proposed marriage to the sun, which answered that although he might illuminate all of universe’s creations, the cloud was capable of blocking his light, so the cloud was a higher being. So the mole proposed to the cloud, and the cloud said the wind was capable of scattering him with a single blow, so the wind was a higher being. So the mole propose to the wind, and the wind said he was incapable of knocking down the stone Buddha standing in the middle of the field, so the stone Buddha was a higher being. When the mole proposed to the stone Buddha, the stone Buddha said that he had no choice but to fall when the mole dug under him, so the mole was a higher being. The mole finally realize that he was the highest being of them all and found a mole for his daughter to wed.

This tale explains the origin of the expression, dudeojihonin, or “mole wedding, ” an analogy for vain and groundless hope. The story emphasizes the relativity of one’s abilities and conditions through the cycle of vain pursuit for something better.

Mole Wedding

Mole Wedding
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer SimWoojang(沈愚章)

This tale narrates the story of a mole searching for the world’s best groom for its daughter, who in the end gets a mole as its son-in-law. The narrative is documented in Sunoji (Fifteen- Day Record) by Hong Man-jong. In the oral tradition, the tale has been transmitted since ancient times across Asia, with various versions that feature other animals like rats, and the mountains as the higher being. A long time ago there lived a mole who had a beautiful daughter. He wanted the best groom in the world for his daughter, and proposed marriage to the sun, which answered that although he might illuminate all of universe’s creations, the cloud was capable of blocking his light, so the cloud was a higher being. So the mole proposed to the cloud, and the cloud said the wind was capable of scattering him with a single blow, so the wind was a higher being. So the mole propose to the wind, and the wind said he was incapable of knocking down the stone Buddha standing in the middle of the field, so the stone Buddha was a higher being. When the mole proposed to the stone Buddha, the stone Buddha said that he had no choice but to fall when the mole dug under him, so the mole was a higher being. The mole finally realize that he was the highest being of them all and found a mole for his daughter to wed. This tale explains the origin of the expression, dudeojihonin, or “mole wedding, ” an analogy for vain and groundless hope. The story emphasizes the relativity of one’s abilities and conditions through the cycle of vain pursuit for something better.