Cold Dew

Headword

한로 ( 寒露 , Hallo )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 9th Lunar month > Seasonal Terms

Writer CheonJinki(千鎭基)
Date of update 2019-05-15

Hallo (Kor. 한로, Chin. 寒露, lit. Cold Dew), the seventeenth of the twenty-four solar terms, is marked by a drop in temperature, when dew is on the verge of turning into frost. On the Gregorian calendar, Hallo usually falls on October eighth or ninth, when the sun is at 195° on the ecliptic. On the lunar calendar, Hallo falls in the ninth month.

At this time of year, farmers thresh grain and are busy trying to finish all harvest-related tasks before the temperature plummets further. The colors of the trees become darker, and swallows and other summer birds vanish from sight, replaced by winter birds such as wild geese.

As Hallo occurs at a period similar to Jungyangjeol (Kor. 중양절, Chin. 重陽節, the ninth of the ninth lunar month), the customs observed on both days are similar. Practices such as adorning one’s hair with Korean evodia blossoms or climbing high hills to look in the direction of one’s hometown are frequently mentioned in poems. Climbing heights while wearing Korean evodia blossoms in one’s hair was believed to help thwart sundry spirits because of the crimson red color of evodia fruits. All red tones were attributed the power of keeping evil influences at bay. The best known dish associated with this time of year is loach soup which is served between the solar terms of Hallo and Sanggang (Kor. 상강, Chin. 霜降, lit. Fall of Frost).

Cold Dew

Cold Dew
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 9th Lunar month > Seasonal Terms

Writer CheonJinki(千鎭基)
Date of update 2019-05-15

Hallo (Kor. 한로, Chin. 寒露, lit. Cold Dew), the seventeenth of the twenty-four solar terms, is marked by a drop in temperature, when dew is on the verge of turning into frost. On the Gregorian calendar, Hallo usually falls on October eighth or ninth, when the sun is at 195° on the ecliptic. On the lunar calendar, Hallo falls in the ninth month. At this time of year, farmers thresh grain and are busy trying to finish all harvest-related tasks before the temperature plummets further. The colors of the trees become darker, and swallows and other summer birds vanish from sight, replaced by winter birds such as wild geese. As Hallo occurs at a period similar to Jungyangjeol (Kor. 중양절, Chin. 重陽節, the ninth of the ninth lunar month), the customs observed on both days are similar. Practices such as adorning one’s hair with Korean evodia blossoms or climbing high hills to look in the direction of one’s hometown are frequently mentioned in poems. Climbing heights while wearing Korean evodia blossoms in one’s hair was believed to help thwart sundry spirits because of the crimson red color of evodia fruits. All red tones were attributed the power of keeping evil influences at bay. The best known dish associated with this time of year is loach soup which is served between the solar terms of Hallo and Sanggang (Kor. 상강, Chin. 霜降, lit. Fall of Frost).