Korean Hacky Sack

Headword

제기차기 ( Jegi Chagi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Winter > 12th Lunar month > Game

Writer SimSeunggu(沈勝求)
Date of update 2019-01-29

Jegi chagi (Kor. 제기차기, lit. hacking jegi) is a game similar to the Western game of hacky sack. It is played by kicking a shuttlecock-like object called a jegi (Kor. 제기) into the air. A seasonal game associated with the Lunar New Year holidays and winter time in general, jegi chagi is mostly played by children.

Jegi chagi originates from a ball game called chukguk (Kor. 축국, Chin. 蹴鞠) that dates back to antiquity. Both jegi and jegi chagi are vernacular translations of the Chinese word chukguk. Chukguk was played with a ball rather than a shuttlecock and was known in the early Joseon period (1392-16th century) as dyeogi (Kor. 뎌기). The word jegi was first used in the 18th century, after successive etymological changes from dyeogi to jyeogi (Kor. 져기), from jyeogi to jyeog-i (Kor. 젹이), and finally from jyeog-i to jegi.

Jegi chagi is played with a shuttlecock made with a coin that has a hole in the middle. The coin is wrapped with a thin but sturdy sheet of paper or fabric, and the excess paper or fabric is put through the middle hole and torn at the edge into thin strips to make fringes. Jegi were also sometimes made by wrapping dirt or dry horse dung in a piece of cloth and adding pheasant tail feathers to create a fluttering tail. There are several ways of kicking a jegi. A player can hold up the leg used to kick the jegi, with both hands, use one foot or both feet to kick, or use a reverse kick. The game may be played by a single-player or as a multi-player game where the participants pass the jegi to each other.

Korean Hacky Sack

Korean Hacky Sack
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Winter > 12th Lunar month > Game

Writer SimSeunggu(沈勝求)
Date of update 2019-01-29

Jegi chagi (Kor. 제기차기, lit. hacking jegi) is a game similar to the Western game of hacky sack. It is played by kicking a shuttlecock-like object called a jegi (Kor. 제기) into the air. A seasonal game associated with the Lunar New Year holidays and winter time in general, jegi chagi is mostly played by children. Jegi chagi originates from a ball game called chukguk (Kor. 축국, Chin. 蹴鞠) that dates back to antiquity. Both jegi and jegi chagi are vernacular translations of the Chinese word chukguk. Chukguk was played with a ball rather than a shuttlecock and was known in the early Joseon period (1392-16th century) as dyeogi (Kor. 뎌기). The word jegi was first used in the 18th century, after successive etymological changes from dyeogi to jyeogi (Kor. 져기), from jyeogi to jyeog-i (Kor. 젹이), and finally from jyeog-i to jegi. Jegi chagi is played with a shuttlecock made with a coin that has a hole in the middle. The coin is wrapped with a thin but sturdy sheet of paper or fabric, and the excess paper or fabric is put through the middle hole and torn at the edge into thin strips to make fringes. Jegi were also sometimes made by wrapping dirt or dry horse dung in a piece of cloth and adding pheasant tail feathers to create a fluttering tail. There are several ways of kicking a jegi. A player can hold up the leg used to kick the jegi, with both hands, use one foot or both feet to kick, or use a reverse kick. The game may be played by a single-player or as a multi-player game where the participants pass the jegi to each other.