Altar for Village Rituals(酺祭坛)

Headword

포제단 ( 酺祭坛 , Pojedan )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer KimDongsub(金東燮)

Pojedan is a term that refers to the altar and ritual venue for the Confucian village ritual poje, observed on Jeju Island.

Generally there are three different types of pojedan: Altars are the most basic; stone walls were developed by the need to build a boundary between the ritual venue and secular spaces; and shrines are the most recent developments, owing to the increase in population and in the number of visitors, which called for a more comfortable shelter. Stone walls make up the most wide spread form of altar, but shrines are on the rise and open-space types are observed as well.

Altar-type pojedan are located in residential areas or deep in the mountains, comprising simply a flat altar made of natural stones, with small flat stones laid out in the number of the spirits enshrined at the altar. When rituals are held here, the ritual officials use temporary tents set up by the altar as accommodations. Stone wall types are fenced by a wall, inside which is an altar, either with a roof structure or without. Shrine types can accommodate ritual officials in the days that lead up to the rituals, during which devotions are offered to the gods and strict taboos must be observed.

These ritual venues were originally built in quiet, subdued locations where dog barking or chicken crowing could not be heard, but over time the locations shifted to clean yet accessible places.

Altar for Village Rituals

Altar for Village Rituals
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Ritual Venues

Writer KimDongsub(金東燮)

Pojedan is a term that refers to the altar and ritual venue for the Confucian village ritual poje, observed on Jeju Island. Generally there are three different types of pojedan: Altars are the most basic; stone walls were developed by the need to build a boundary between the ritual venue and secular spaces; and shrines are the most recent developments, owing to the increase in population and in the number of visitors, which called for a more comfortable shelter. Stone walls make up the most wide spread form of altar, but shrines are on the rise and open-space types are observed as well. Altar-type pojedan are located in residential areas or deep in the mountains, comprising simply a flat altar made of natural stones, with small flat stones laid out in the number of the spirits enshrined at the altar. When rituals are held here, the ritual officials use temporary tents set up by the altar as accommodations. Stone wall types are fenced by a wall, inside which is an altar, either with a roof structure or without. Shrine types can accommodate ritual officials in the days that lead up to the rituals, during which devotions are offered to the gods and strict taboos must be observed. These ritual venues were originally built in quiet, subdued locations where dog barking or chicken crowing could not be heard, but over time the locations shifted to clean yet accessible places.