House Entry Ritual

Headword

입택고사 ( Iptaekgosa )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > Rites and Officiants

Writer AnHyekyung(安惠敬)
Date of update 2019-01-31

Iptaekgosa is a ritual held upon moving into a newly constructed home or from one house to another, to pray for peace and prosperity for the family.

These house entry rituals, also called jipgosa (house ritual), are observed around the country.

Iptaekgosa can be categorized into ritual types and sorcery types.

Ritual types can again be grouped into reception rites for the house guardian god Seongju, officiated by a shaman or recitation sorcerer, and house entry rites officiated by the head of the family in the tradition of household god worship rituals. The latter focuses on reporting to Seongju and other household gods that a new family has moved in, and to ask for peace and protection. Sacrificial foods include layered rice cake (sirutteok) and wine, and after offering bows, the rice cake is cut up into chunks and placed in various corners of the house. This ritual is followed by the invitation of neighbors into the house (jipdeuri).

Sorcery-type house entry rituals are practiced in a range of methods that vary by family and aim at preventing bad fortune or bad energy that can arise in an unfamiliar setting. The ritual is also called isaaengmagi (prevention of bad fortune upon moving) and in contemporary times talismans (bujeok) have become a big part of the ritual, issued by a Buddhist monk or a shaman, who sometimes bring the talismans and hangs them over gates and doors after a round of prayers around the house.

House Entry Ritual

House Entry Ritual
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > Rites and Officiants

Writer AnHyekyung(安惠敬)
Date of update 2019-01-31

Iptaekgosa is a ritual held upon moving into a newly constructed home or from one house to another, to pray for peace and prosperity for the family. These house entry rituals, also called jipgosa (house ritual), are observed around the country. Iptaekgosa can be categorized into ritual types and sorcery types. Ritual types can again be grouped into reception rites for the house guardian god Seongju, officiated by a shaman or recitation sorcerer, and house entry rites officiated by the head of the family in the tradition of household god worship rituals. The latter focuses on reporting to Seongju and other household gods that a new family has moved in, and to ask for peace and protection. Sacrificial foods include layered rice cake (sirutteok) and wine, and after offering bows, the rice cake is cut up into chunks and placed in various corners of the house. This ritual is followed by the invitation of neighbors into the house (jipdeuri). Sorcery-type house entry rituals are practiced in a range of methods that vary by family and aim at preventing bad fortune or bad energy that can arise in an unfamiliar setting. The ritual is also called isaaengmagi (prevention of bad fortune upon moving) and in contemporary times talismans (bujeok) have become a big part of the ritual, issued by a Buddhist monk or a shaman, who sometimes bring the talismans and hangs them over gates and doors after a round of prayers around the house.