God of Property(业神)

Headword

( 业神 , Eop )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > Divinities

Writer KimJongdae(金宗大)

Eop is a deity that oversees the material possessions of a household.

This household god resides in furtive corners of the house like the pantry or shed and brings material fortune. Alternate versions of its name include Eopsin, Eopwang, Eopwisin, and also jikimi (guardian) or jipjikimi (house guardian) in secular terms. Sacred entities that embody Eop include conical bundles of straw or pine needles (jujeori), while it is also identified as animals like serpents, weasels, toads, pigs, mice, even humans, a phenomenon unique among household gods. In Andong, North Gyeongsang Province, where the dragon jar (yongdanji) is the predominant form of household god worship, the dragon is considered as a presence identical to the serpent and is worshipped as Eop. The serpent Eop is believed to live on the roof of a house, and when it is observed in other parts of the house, it is considered a sign that the household is in decline. To pray for the serpent to return to the roof, human hair is burned to give off smells or rice porridge is cooked to offer to the serpent. These efforts are usually fruitless, however, because Eop behaves according to its own will and will leave in the event of misfortune in the house. Ineop, or Human God of Property, is another form of this deity, which attaches itself to humans and brings good fortune. Its appearance is identical to the person it is attached to, which means the person and his Eop are indistinguishable despite the fact that the two are separate beings.

There are many tales and accounts related to Eop, especially about serpents leaving the house, which results in the fall of the family. Similar stories apply to Ineop. Rituals for Eop are generally held in the tenth lunar month, and also on Dongji (Winter Solstice), when a large bowl of red bean porridge (patjuk) is offered to the deity. If the bowl has not been emptied after a time, it was believed to be a bad omen.

God of Property

God of Property
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > Divinities

Writer KimJongdae(金宗大)

Eop is a deity that oversees the material possessions of a household. This household god resides in furtive corners of the house like the pantry or shed and brings material fortune. Alternate versions of its name include Eopsin, Eopwang, Eopwisin, and also jikimi (guardian) or jipjikimi (house guardian) in secular terms. Sacred entities that embody Eop include conical bundles of straw or pine needles (jujeori), while it is also identified as animals like serpents, weasels, toads, pigs, mice, even humans, a phenomenon unique among household gods. In Andong, North Gyeongsang Province, where the dragon jar (yongdanji) is the predominant form of household god worship, the dragon is considered as a presence identical to the serpent and is worshipped as Eop. The serpent Eop is believed to live on the roof of a house, and when it is observed in other parts of the house, it is considered a sign that the household is in decline. To pray for the serpent to return to the roof, human hair is burned to give off smells or rice porridge is cooked to offer to the serpent. These efforts are usually fruitless, however, because Eop behaves according to its own will and will leave in the event of misfortune in the house. Ineop, or Human God of Property, is another form of this deity, which attaches itself to humans and brings good fortune. Its appearance is identical to the person it is attached to, which means the person and his Eop are indistinguishable despite the fact that the two are separate beings. There are many tales and accounts related to Eop, especially about serpents leaving the house, which results in the fall of the family. Similar stories apply to Ineop. Rituals for Eop are generally held in the tenth lunar month, and also on Dongji (Winter Solstice), when a large bowl of red bean porridge (patjuk) is offered to the deity. If the bowl has not been emptied after a time, it was believed to be a bad omen.