Talisman(符籍)

Headword

부적 ( 符籍 , Bujeok )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > Ritual Props

Writer KimYoungja(金英子)

Bujeok is the term for talisman, comprising letters or patterns that are believed to carry the power to chase away evil ghosts and prevent calamities.

In Korean folk religion, amulet sheets are generally made by painting letters or pictures in red on a sheet of yellow paper, and can be categorized into good fortune talismans (gilsangbujeok) and ghost-repelling talismans (byeoksabujeok). The former includes wish talismans (sowonseongchwibu), prosperity talismans (bugwibu), harmony-and-longevity-in-the-family talismans (bubujasonhwahapjangsubu), and protectionfrom- benevolent-god talismans (seonsinsuhobu), while the latter includes protection-against-ghostattacks talismans (gwisinbulchimbu), disease talismans (jilbyeongbu), and three-calamities talismans (samjaebu).

Among them, disease talismans (jilbyeongbu) were used to prevent illnesses caused by evil ghosts. When medicines show no effect, an amulet sheet written in cinnabar is burned to drink the ashes with water, which is believed to help treatment as a supplement to medication.

Three-calamities talismans (samjaebu) help prevent against the three major calamities (samjae) that can occur in life–referring to war, smallpox and famine, or water calamities, fire calamities and wind calamities. There are myriad types of talismans for this purpose, the most distinctive among them the threeheaded- one-footed-hawk talisman, which was based on a subgenre of paintings of the three-headed hawk from early Joseon.

There were also talismans for seasonal occasions including Dano talisman, pasted over gates or on pillars, and the winter solstice talisman (dongjibujeok), pasted on the pillars or walls of the kitchen on winter solstice.

Talisman

Talisman
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > Ritual Props

Writer KimYoungja(金英子)

Bujeok is the term for talisman, comprising letters or patterns that are believed to carry the power to chase away evil ghosts and prevent calamities. In Korean folk religion, amulet sheets are generally made by painting letters or pictures in red on a sheet of yellow paper, and can be categorized into good fortune talismans (gilsangbujeok) and ghost-repelling talismans (byeoksabujeok). The former includes wish talismans (sowonseongchwibu), prosperity talismans (bugwibu), harmony-and-longevity-in-the-family talismans (bubujasonhwahapjangsubu), and protectionfrom- benevolent-god talismans (seonsinsuhobu), while the latter includes protection-against-ghostattacks talismans (gwisinbulchimbu), disease talismans (jilbyeongbu), and three-calamities talismans (samjaebu). Among them, disease talismans (jilbyeongbu) were used to prevent illnesses caused by evil ghosts. When medicines show no effect, an amulet sheet written in cinnabar is burned to drink the ashes with water, which is believed to help treatment as a supplement to medication. Three-calamities talismans (samjaebu) help prevent against the three major calamities (samjae) that can occur in life–referring to war, smallpox and famine, or water calamities, fire calamities and wind calamities. There are myriad types of talismans for this purpose, the most distinctive among them the threeheaded- one-footed-hawk talisman, which was based on a subgenre of paintings of the three-headed hawk from early Joseon. There were also talismans for seasonal occasions including Dano talisman, pasted over gates or on pillars, and the winter solstice talisman (dongjibujeok), pasted on the pillars or walls of the kitchen on winter solstice.