Ritual for Government Office Deity(府君堂祭)

Headword

부군당제 ( 府君堂祭 , Bugundangje )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Rites and Officiants

Writer KimTaewoo(金泰佑)

Bugundangje refers to rituals held at shrines set up near or on the grounds of government offices in the capital or in the provinces during Joseon (1392-1910), rituals now observed in the Seoul area along the Han River.

During Joseon, every government building in Seoul had a shrine where newly appointed officials held a rite, and which also served as the venue for annual rites on the first day of the tenth lunar month; this was a prototype of rituals referred to today as bugundangje and observed in regions along the Han River. This contemporary version generally takes the form of a shamanic village ritual, combined with elements of a Confucian memorial rite. The shamanic portion of the ritual for the government office deity is called bugundanggut, which is based on the procedures of private shamanic rituals from the Seoul area but expanded with the addition of segments characteristic of village rituals in the region, including the village parade (maeuldolgi) and the Bonhyang (God of Ancestral Roots) and Gunung (Martial Hero Deity) segments. Other segments particular to this rite were also added, including the Bugun (Government Office Deity) segment, to form what is now known as the shamanic procedures of this ritual. Bugundang je takes place at various times of the year, usually in the first, fourth, seventh, and tenth lunar months, with a majority taking place in the tenth month or the first day of the first lunar month. Each year a shaman is selected as dangjumudang, or head host shaman, to oversee the preparations and maintain a close dangol relationship with the members of the community. In the past, the Confucian rite was followed by shamanic ritual procedures, but this part of the ritual has increasingly been omitted in contemporary times.

Ritual for Government Office Deity

Ritual for Government Office Deity
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Village Gods > Rites and Officiants

Writer KimTaewoo(金泰佑)

Bugundangje refers to rituals held at shrines set up near or on the grounds of government offices in the capital or in the provinces during Joseon (1392-1910), rituals now observed in the Seoul area along the Han River. During Joseon, every government building in Seoul had a shrine where newly appointed officials held a rite, and which also served as the venue for annual rites on the first day of the tenth lunar month; this was a prototype of rituals referred to today as bugundangje and observed in regions along the Han River. This contemporary version generally takes the form of a shamanic village ritual, combined with elements of a Confucian memorial rite. The shamanic portion of the ritual for the government office deity is called bugundanggut, which is based on the procedures of private shamanic rituals from the Seoul area but expanded with the addition of segments characteristic of village rituals in the region, including the village parade (maeuldolgi) and the Bonhyang (God of Ancestral Roots) and Gunung (Martial Hero Deity) segments. Other segments particular to this rite were also added, including the Bugun (Government Office Deity) segment, to form what is now known as the shamanic procedures of this ritual. Bugundang je takes place at various times of the year, usually in the first, fourth, seventh, and tenth lunar months, with a majority taking place in the tenth month or the first day of the first lunar month. Each year a shaman is selected as dangjumudang, or head host shaman, to oversee the preparations and maintain a close dangol relationship with the members of the community. In the past, the Confucian rite was followed by shamanic ritual procedures, but this part of the ritual has increasingly been omitted in contemporary times.