A Record of the Seasonal Customs of the Eastern Kingdom

Headword

동국세시기 ( 東國歲時記 , Dongguksesigi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > References

Writer SangKisook(尙基淑)
Date of update 2019-01-31

Dongguksesigi (A Record of the Seasonal Customs of the Eastern Kingdom) is an almanac of the monthly seasonal customs written by Hong Seok-mo, a scholar in Joseon during the reigns of King Jeongjo (1725-1800) and King Sunjo (1800-1834).

The book records the monthly seasonal rites practiced around the country from the first lunar month to the twelfth, including a leap month, as observed in the royal court; by aristocrats and literati; and by the commoners of farming, fishing and mountain communities. Customs that do not follow specific dates in a month are listed separately under “wollae, ” meaning “within the month.” A total of 23 customs are listed, 34 including the wollae category. Seven of them are listed under the first lunar month, the biggest number of rites under a single month, followed by the third lunar month, with three.

Each custom is described with quotes from writings and poems on the seasonal customs of China. The 15th-century cultural geography Donggukyeojiseungnam (Augmented Survey of the Geography of the Eastern Kingdom) was also widely quoted in introducing the Korean customs.

A Record of the Seasonal Customs of the Eastern Kingdom

A Record of the Seasonal Customs of the Eastern Kingdom
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Worship of Household Gods > References

Writer SangKisook(尙基淑)
Date of update 2019-01-31

Dongguksesigi (A Record of the Seasonal Customs of the Eastern Kingdom) is an almanac of the monthly seasonal customs written by Hong Seok-mo, a scholar in Joseon during the reigns of King Jeongjo (1725-1800) and King Sunjo (1800-1834). The book records the monthly seasonal rites practiced around the country from the first lunar month to the twelfth, including a leap month, as observed in the royal court; by aristocrats and literati; and by the commoners of farming, fishing and mountain communities. Customs that do not follow specific dates in a month are listed separately under “wollae, ” meaning “within the month.” A total of 23 customs are listed, 34 including the wollae category. Seven of them are listed under the first lunar month, the biggest number of rites under a single month, followed by the third lunar month, with three. Each custom is described with quotes from writings and poems on the seasonal customs of China. The 15th-century cultural geography Donggukyeojiseungnam (Augmented Survey of the Geography of the Eastern Kingdom) was also widely quoted in introducing the Korean customs.