Sitting Ritual

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Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Rites and Officiants

Writer AnSangkyung(安相敬)
Date of update 2019-01-29

Anjeungut, or sitting ritual, is a form of shamanic ritual that centers on the practice of dokgyeong, or scripture recitation, by sorceresses or sorcerers.

In anjeungut, the sorcerer is in a seated position, reciting the scriptures to his own accompaniment of janggu (hourglass drum), jing (gong), or kkwaenggwari (small gong). This ritual has been preserved mainly in Chungcheong and North Jeolla provinces.

In Chungcheong Province, anjeungut involves more than recitation, a complex procedure that mixes a range of direct and intense sorcery practices and elements including seolgyeong, which are shamanic props made of paper in various patterns, hung around the ritual venue; divination carried out by reading the gods’ intents from the shaking of his stick; or locking up the evil spirit by means of a mock chase. Anjeungut of Chungcheong can be categorized into healing rituals like byeonggut (illness ritual), michingut (madness ritual) or pudakgeori (chasing away of evil spirits); rituals to pray for good fortune including antaek (ritual for peace in the house) or gosa (ritual for household gods); possession rituals like sinmyeonggut; and rituals to appease the soul of the dead, including neokgut or jinogwi.

Anjeungut of North Jeolla can be divided into personal rituals (jibangut, meaning domestic ritual) and collective rituals (daedonggut, meaning communal ritual; or keungut, meaning big ritual). The former centers on the sorcerer’s recitation, but in the case of the latter, the recitation is accompanied by song and dance performances by the sorcerer and a large number of musicians and shamans, which results in rituals similar in scale to those officiated by a hereditary shaman (seseummu) and her followers.

Sitting Ritual

Sitting Ritual
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Beliefs > Shamanism > Rites and Officiants

Writer AnSangkyung(安相敬)
Date of update 2019-01-29

Anjeungut, or sitting ritual, is a form of shamanic ritual that centers on the practice of dokgyeong, or scripture recitation, by sorceresses or sorcerers. In anjeungut, the sorcerer is in a seated position, reciting the scriptures to his own accompaniment of janggu (hourglass drum), jing (gong), or kkwaenggwari (small gong). This ritual has been preserved mainly in Chungcheong and North Jeolla provinces. In Chungcheong Province, anjeungut involves more than recitation, a complex procedure that mixes a range of direct and intense sorcery practices and elements including seolgyeong, which are shamanic props made of paper in various patterns, hung around the ritual venue; divination carried out by reading the gods’ intents from the shaking of his stick; or locking up the evil spirit by means of a mock chase. Anjeungut of Chungcheong can be categorized into healing rituals like byeonggut (illness ritual), michingut (madness ritual) or pudakgeori (chasing away of evil spirits); rituals to pray for good fortune including antaek (ritual for peace in the house) or gosa (ritual for household gods); possession rituals like sinmyeonggut; and rituals to appease the soul of the dead, including neokgut or jinogwi. Anjeungut of North Jeolla can be divided into personal rituals (jibangut, meaning domestic ritual) and collective rituals (daedonggut, meaning communal ritual; or keungut, meaning big ritual). The former centers on the sorcerer’s recitation, but in the case of the latter, the recitation is accompanied by song and dance performances by the sorcerer and a large number of musicians and shamans, which results in rituals similar in scale to those officiated by a hereditary shaman (seseummu) and her followers.