Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts

Writer PyoInju(表仁柱)

A game clashing two gos, long structures made of logs and straw, to decide a winner.

The origin of Gossaum Nori remains unknown due to the lack of any historical record, however, the tradition was passed down through word of mouth.

According to the data, Chilseok Village has a strong, earthly energy, based on the principles of Feng-Shui, due to its characteristic of taking the form of an ox laying down. This resulted in the villagers being unable to raise dogs there, leading to their raising geese instead. A long time ago, one Taoist passed by the village and told people to plant a gingko tree to counter the strong energy of the land, prophesying, “The energy of the village land will interrupt the success of young and middle-aged people.” The villagers also created a pond, symbolizing a trough, at the exact location at the mouth of the ox, and, if the ox stood up, it would have stepped on farmlands, causing significant damage. They tied the symbolic reins of the ox to the gingko tree, which was the sacred tree of Halmeoni Dangsan, and held its tail down with seven stones. In addition to, villagers played Gossaum Nori to step and press down the land on Jeongwol Daeboreum (the first full moon of the lunar calendar).

Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori ceased around the 1940s, restored in 1969, and was designated as important intangible cultural heritage No. 33 in 1970.

Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori is a classic battle-type game between two teams, closely related to rice farming culture, that holds a substantial meaning in folklore. Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori, a Honam-native game, is a communal and seasonal game that requires the spirit of teamwork and unity. It is also closely related to Juldarigi (tug-of-war), given that it has the shamanic and religious characteristics of wishing for an abundant rice crop. In particular, Juldarigi, as a community game prevalent in rice growing regions, is the root of the origin of Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori.

Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori

Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Arts

Writer PyoInju(表仁柱)

A game clashing two gos, long structures made of logs and straw, to decide a winner. The origin of Gossaum Nori remains unknown due to the lack of any historical record, however, the tradition was passed down through word of mouth. According to the data, Chilseok Village has a strong, earthly energy, based on the principles of Feng-Shui, due to its characteristic of taking the form of an ox laying down. This resulted in the villagers being unable to raise dogs there, leading to their raising geese instead. A long time ago, one Taoist passed by the village and told people to plant a gingko tree to counter the strong energy of the land, prophesying, “The energy of the village land will interrupt the success of young and middle-aged people.” The villagers also created a pond, symbolizing a trough, at the exact location at the mouth of the ox, and, if the ox stood up, it would have stepped on farmlands, causing significant damage. They tied the symbolic reins of the ox to the gingko tree, which was the sacred tree of Halmeoni Dangsan, and held its tail down with seven stones. In addition to, villagers played Gossaum Nori to step and press down the land on Jeongwol Daeboreum (the first full moon of the lunar calendar). Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori ceased around the 1940s, restored in 1969, and was designated as important intangible cultural heritage No. 33 in 1970. Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori is a classic battle-type game between two teams, closely related to rice farming culture, that holds a substantial meaning in folklore. Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori, a Honam-native game, is a communal and seasonal game that requires the spirit of teamwork and unity. It is also closely related to Juldarigi (tug-of-war), given that it has the shamanic and religious characteristics of wishing for an abundant rice crop. In particular, Juldarigi, as a community game prevalent in rice growing regions, is the root of the origin of Gwangju Chilseok Gossaum Nori.