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01

Earthenware Jar

Danji is an earthenware jar that is worshipped as a sacred entity enshringing a household god, or as the deity itself. These jars are small and round, bulging around the center, and their names vary according to the enshrined deity. Daegamdanji is the sacred entity for Daegamsin (State Official God), who oversees a family’s material fortune. This jar is usually enshrined in the grain shed, but sometimes in a corner of the inner chamber, the open hall, the kitchen, or outdoors in some cases. The

Korean Folk Beliefs

02

Earthenware Jar

Danji is an earthenware jar that is worshipped as a sacred entity enshringing a household god, or as the deity itself. These jars are small and round, bulging around the center, and their names vary according to the enshrined deity. Daegamdanji is the sacred entity for Daegamsin (State Official God), who oversees a family’s material fortune. This jar is usually enshrined in the grain shed, but sometimes in a corner of the inner chamber, the open hall, the kitchen, or outdoors in some cases. The

Korean Folk Beliefs

03

Field Play

Deulnoreum (Kor. 들놀음, Chin. 野遊, lit. field play) is a traditional mask play held during the Great Full Moon Festival (the fifteenth of the first lunar month) in Dongnae-gu and Suyeong-dong of Nam-gu, both located in the Busan administrative area. In the past deulnoreum was generally the name used by the elderly and women in the area, to refer to the mask play, while the “learned people” and the younger people more oftenly referred to it as yaryu (Kor. 야류, Chin. 野遊). Both names mean “outdoor play

Korean Seasonal Customs

04

Second Senior Rank Pine of Mt. Songni in Boeun

The legend of Jeongipumsong (Second Senior Rank Pine), which stands in the path to the temple Beopjusa on Mt. Songni, narrates the story related to the tree and King Sejo of Joseon. The story is based on the king’s visit to the village of Hoein and Mt. Songni in Boeun, North Chungcheong Province, in the second lunar month of the 10th year of his reign (1464). The anecdote about the pine tree, however, is not found in historical records and the oral transmission is based on the imagination and hi

Korean Folk Literature

05

Flower Card Game

Hwatu (Kor. 화투, Chin. 花鬪, lit. flower fight) is a game played with a deck of forty-eight cards comprising twelve sets of four cards, each set representing one of the twelve months of the year. Each card has images of flowers or plants associated with the corresponding month on its face. Pine trees are the motif of the January cards; plum flowers, February; cherry blossoms, March; black bush clovers, April; orchids, June; peonies, July; red bush clovers, July; full moon, August; chrysanthemums, S

Korean Seasonal Customs

06

Arrow Throwing

Tuho (Kor. 투호, Chin. 投壺, lit. throwing into a vase) is a game in which players are divided into two teams and throw arrows into a vase placed at a certain distance. The vases into which the arrows are thrown vary both in size and shape. The size of the arrows also differs, and each player is given a set of twelve arrows. Points are earned depending on the proximitiy of the arrow to the center of the vase. The game originated in China prior to the Han dynasty (BCE 206 - CE 220). It is mentioned i

Korean Seasonal Customs

07

Tightrope Walking

Traditional Korean tightrope-walking performance is referred to as jultagi (Kor. 줄타기) and, in contrast with similar foreign genres, combines acrobatics with dancing, singing, and humor. The tightrope walker exchanges jokes with another member of the troupe who is standing on the ground. The accompanying music is played on string and wind instruments. Jultagi was one of the most popular forms of entertainment in traditional Korea. The performances attracted not only large crowds of common people,

Korean Seasonal Customs